• Lacrimae Rerum, homage to Gustav Metzger

    Part II

     

    Gustav Metzger 

    Armando Andrade Tudela 

    Daniel Steegmann Mangrané

  • Lacrimea Rerum, homage to Gustav Metzger - Part II, showcases Gustav Metzger's historical drawings from the 50s alongside two major...

    Lacrimea Rerum, homage to Gustav Metzger - Part II, showcases Gustav Metzger's historical drawings from the 50s alongside two major paintings from the 50s and 60s as well as his renowned installation To Crawl Into - Anschluss, Vienna. 

    Armando Andrade Tudela and Daniel Steegmann Mangrané have especially created works for this exhibition, echoing  Metzger's impressive practice. 

     

    Gustav Metzger was a visionary artist and radical thinker. At the heart of his practice, which spanned over 65 years, are a series of constantly opposing yet interdependent forces such as destruction and creation.  His auto-destructive art, meant as a public art form, sought to provide a mirror of a social and political system that he felt was indifferently progressing towards total obliteration. 

     

    ‘Lacrimae Rerum’ (‘Tears of things’), homage to Gustav Metzger is a unique collaboration between Dvir Gallery and the Gustav Metzger Foundation.

     

    Review by  Tal Sterngast - Art Agenda

     

     

  • Gustav Metzger, Historic Photographs: To Crawl Into - Anschluss, Vienna, March 1938, 1996-2020

    Historic Photographs: To Crawl Into - Anschluss, Vienna, March 1938, 1996-2020

    Gustav Metzger

    The principal component of this work is a press photograph, taken shortly after Austria’s annexation to Nazi Germany in March 1938, that depicts Jewish men, women and children being forced to wash the streets of Vienna as their fellow citizens look on. The photograph has been enlarged to over thirteen square metres – rendering the figures larger than life-size – and is displayed on the floor, covered with a cotton sheet. In order to see it, the viewer is required to crawl on their hands and knees beneath the sheet, mimicking the actions of the Jewish subjects, while the size and proximity of the image makes it impossible to apprehend as a whole.

     

  • The rise and spread of fascism between 1933 and 1945 had a profound personal effect on Metzger, who was born into a Jewish family in the German city of Nuremburg in 1926. At the age of twelve he and his brother were sent to Britain as part of the Refugee Children’s Movement; his parents and two elder sisters were deported to Poland where his parents disappeared in 1943, presumably killed in the Holocaust. His two sisters escaped to England at the beginning of the war. While he acknowledged the importance of his childhood experiences, it was not until the 1980s that the Holocaust was explicitly confronted in Metzger’s work, beginning in 1981 with a display of anti-Semitic laws at the Kunstmuseum in Bern.

     

    To Crawl Into forms part of Metzger’s Historic Photographs series, begun in 1990, which engages with the Holocaust alongside other events of twentieth-century history (see, for example, To Walk Into – Massacre on the Mount, Jerusalem 8 November 1990 1996, Tate T12451). In each work a photograph documenting the event is hugely enlarged, before being somehow obscured, by a sheet for example, a curtain, or a screen of wooden boards. Metzger has explained that these works seek to provoke a re-evaluation of well-worn media imagery by physically preventing the viewer from considering the photograph passively, even forcing them to share the sense of physical aggression perpetrated against its subjects. Interviewed in 1996, Metzger elaborated on the importance of physical engagement to this particular work, referring to an occasion in 1970 when Willy Brandt, then-leader of West Germany, knelt before a monument to the 1943 Ghetto Uprising during a state visit to Poland: "It has to do with Willy Brandt, keeling down in Warsaw – very public, as head of the German government. He knelt down in front of this monument ... I think what I’m doing is offering everybody a chance to kneel down in front of history ... accepting the heaviness, the weight of history ... to go in and confront the past."

     

  • Drawings and Paintings, Gustav Metzger Drawings and Paintings, Gustav Metzger Drawings and Paintings, Gustav Metzger Drawings and Paintings, Gustav Metzger Drawings and Paintings, Gustav Metzger Drawings and Paintings, Gustav Metzger

    Drawings and Paintings

    Gustav Metzger

    In Gustav Metzger’s paintings and drawings, tradition and abstract-expressionist present merge in a sort of dessin automatique. What we witness here is the immediate transfer of perception and concrete materialization on paper or on board. Metzger’s imperative, clearly aimed at the destruction of the artwork, does not seem to come to bear. The drawings and paintings occupy a third space between auto-destruction and auto-creation and are certainly not autobut rather only the creative product of the artist’s hand. With the formal turbulence and the emotional agitation that pervades his sheets he seems to be in line with an observation made by Clement Greenberg on American abstract artists at about the same time: « The chromaticity, the vertical, the concentric, the fusion of forms all that does not exist for its own sake but first and foremost for the emotional sake. If these works fail in expressing and conveying feelings, they fail altogether. » (Thomas Miessgang, 2018)

  • Historical Paintings

    Gustav Metzger
    • Drawing #5, 1953 pastel and graphite 20 x 25 cm
      Drawing #5, 1953
      pastel and graphite
      20 x 25 cm
    • Drawing #6, 1953 pastel and graphite 20 x 25 cm
      Drawing #6, 1953
      pastel and graphite
      20 x 25 cm
    • Drawing #4, 1953 pastel and graphite 20 x 25 cm
      Drawing #4, 1953
      pastel and graphite
      20 x 25 cm
    • Drawing #8, 1953 pastel and graphite 20 x 25 cm
      Drawing #8, 1953
      pastel and graphite
      20 x 25 cm
    • Drawing #10, 1953 pastel and graphite 20 x 25 cm
      Drawing #10, 1953
      pastel and graphite
      20 x 25 cm
    • Drawing #11, 1953 pastel and graphite 20 x 25 cm
      Drawing #11, 1953
      pastel and graphite
      20 x 25 cm
    • Drawing #12, 1953 pastel and graphite 20 x 25 cm
      Drawing #12, 1953
      pastel and graphite
      20 x 25 cm
    • Drawing #14, 1953 pastel and graphite 20 x 25 cm
      Drawing #14, 1953
      pastel and graphite
      20 x 25 cm
  • Armando Andrade Tudela, The Edge of the Hole is the Back of a Cave #2, 2020

    The Edge of the Hole is the Back of a Cave

    Armando Andrade Tudela

    Armando Andrade Tudela (b. 1975, Lima, Peru) presents a new body of work entitled ‘The Edge of the Hole is the Back of a Cave’, composed of textile pieces and photographs. There is a direct correlation between the two series as they both represent - as schemas in the case of the textiles and as documentation, in the case of the photographs, what the artist came to regard as “haunted spaces”.


    Considering the textile pieces as floor plans, the central color field became “sieged” by the external walls. Still, a kind of an access was always granted, which by extension determines the final composition and sense of the diagram.
    The black and white photographs document a structure realised some time ago by the Armando Andrade Tudela. The sculpture was abandoned and the patina of time became visible. A labyrinth-like, spacial configuration emerges, yet the aura of previous events, previous actions that have taken place, remains stronger than the logic of its’ form. The series aims to evoke the relation between structure and events and the conditioning of one another.

    • The Edge of the Hole is the Back of a Cave #3 , 2020 textile 297 x 180 cm
      The Edge of the Hole is the Back of a Cave #3 , 2020
      textile
      297 x 180 cm
    • The Edge of a Hole is the Back of a Cave #1, 2020 textile 277 x 235 cm
      The Edge of a Hole is the Back of a Cave #1, 2020
      textile
      277 x 235 cm
    • The Edge of the Hole is the Back of a Cave #4, 2020 textile 226 x 198 cm
      The Edge of the Hole is the Back of a Cave #4, 2020
      textile
      226 x 198 cm
  • Daniel Steegmann Mangrané

    Daniel Steegmann Mangrané

    Daniel Steegmann Mangrané (b. 1977, Barcelona, Spain) practice covers various media and oscillates between subtle, poetic but however raw experimentations that question the relationship between world and language. Although mainly conceptually informed, his installations engage the imagination of the spectator and display a strong concern with the sensual qualities of concrete objects.


    The new body of work presented in the second part of ‘Lacrimae Rerum’, homage to Gustav Metzger, is composed of a number of old recovered wood beams, neatly split in their aural proportions, which hold with the minimum pressure possible delicate gramineous inflorescences. The contrast between the duress of the beam and the delicacy of the flower acts as a thought-generating principle voicing antipodal ideas like roughness and precariousness, strength and fragility or heaviness and lightness.
    The works thus articulate a sense of space and time, building up a structure that dissolves as the constellation of elements enter into play.

    • (18 x 11), 2020 wooden beam, flower 12 x 6 x 35 cm
      (18 x 11), 2020
      wooden beam, flower
      12 x 6 x 35 cm
    • (210 x 130), 2020 wooden beam, flower 12 x 6 x 346 cm
      (210 x 130), 2020
      wooden beam, flower
      12 x 6 x 346 cm
    • (92 x 56), 2020 wooden beam, flower 12 x 6 x 154 cm
      (92 x 56), 2020
      wooden beam, flower
      12 x 6 x 154 cm
    • (241 x 149), 2020 wooden beam, flower 12 x 6 x 396 cm
      (241 x 149), 2020
      wooden beam, flower
      12 x 6 x 396 cm
  • Daniel Steegmann Mangrané, Lichtzwang, 2020

    Lichtzwang

    Daniel Steegmann Mangrané watercolors on paper
    21 x 177 cm
    unique
  • The German word Lichtzwang, complex to translate literally, could be explained as “light constraint.” Steegmann Mangrané takes the title from a volume of poetry by Paul Celan (1920–1970) - published in English as Lightduress - and highlights two underlying aspects of the work: the imposition of a rule and the modulation of light through the decomposition of color.
    The concepts of margins and limits are fundamental to the development of this series of watercolors begun in 1998 and still ongoing. The common starting point is a sheet of paper taken from an arithmetic exercise book (i.e. patterned with small squares) measuring 21 x 15 centimeters. In each drawing, the artist structures shapes, forms and colors to experiment with the infinite possibilities offered by the printed grid and test its constructional limits. The subgroups of the watercolors query specific problems like the variation of color or the modulation of a structure, characterizing the entire sequence before disappearing into the next one, in which the execution of a transformation or emergence of a compositional rhythm might be discerned. This approach has allowed Steegmann Mangrané to experiment with variations, loops, and permutations, as well as with time and duration. For the artist, this work has been a sort of generative matrix: ideas and forms that originated from Lichtzwang have been further developed in other projects with different media.
    In this show, the entire series is featured in a dynamic relation with the exhibition display: watercolors are hung along a curved fabric partition so that visitors can not only move along the sequence but are also able to catch a glimpse in the background of other works that originate from Lichtzwang.